CONTENT AREA LITERACY STRATEGIES

Science

CLAIMS & EVIDENCE

 

RESOURCES ON THE WEB

Student Blank Worksheet for Claim, Evidence, and Interpretation

A note-taking page to develop an idea using the claim, evidence, and interpretation strategy

Inquiry and scientific explanations: Helping students use evidence and reasoning  by Katherine L. McNeill, Boston College, and Joseph S. Krajcik, University of Michigan

published by National Science Teachers Association Press.

This 21 page PDF file details the process of helping middle school students learn to write claims and evidence because "...students have difficulty providing appropriate evidence for their claims and providing reasoning that describes why their evidence supports their claim."  

The last page contains a basic claims, evidence, reasoning rubric.

Middle School Studentsí Use of Appropriate and Inappropriate Evidence in Writing Scientific Explanations by Katherine L. McNeill & Joseph Krajcik, University of Michigan

From the article abstract:
"Recent science reform efforts and standards documents advocate that students develop scientific inquiry practices, such as the construction and communication of scientific explanations. This paper focuses on 7th grade studentsí scientific explanations during the enactment of a project based chemistry unit where the construction of scientific explanations is a key learning goal."

 

48 page PDF file

 

TESTING ONE PREMISE OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY IN SCIENCE CLASSROOMS: A STUDY THAT EXAMINES STUDENTSí SCIENTIFIC EXPLANATIONS - FEBRUARY 2008

The National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing

Graduate School of Education & Information, UCLA | University of California, Los Angeles

 

From the article abstract:

In this study we analyze the quality of students' written scientific explanations in eight science inquiry-based middle-school classrooms and explore the link between the quality of students' scientific explanations and their students' performance. We analyzed explanations based on three components: claim, evidence to support it, and a reasoning that justifies the link between the claim and evidence. To identify critical features related with high quality explanations we also analyzed the characteristics of the instructional prompts that teachers used. Overall, a low percentage of students (18%) provided explanations with the three expected components. The majority (40%) of the "explanations" found were presented as claims without any supporting data or reasoning.  We report some general characteristics of instructional prompts that showed higher quality of written explanations.

 

46 page PDF file

Videos show how math, science relate to real-world applications and careers


August 1, 2007óMath and science educators will find free video resources that can help connect their lessons to real-world applications at TheFuturesChannel.com. The site produces short documentary-style videos that take students behind the scenes with professionals from a wide range of careers. As the subjects of these video clips discuss why math and science are so important in their respective fields, they help answer the common question, "Why do I need to learn this?" The site's Hand-On Math section features movies on counting numbers and integers, algebra, fractions, geometry, measurement, and statistics. One clip incorporates measurement into a video about college students who must measure food for animal feedings. Teachers can download classroom activities based on the video content. All videos and classroom activities are available free of charge.

http://www.thefutureschannel.com/index.php

SEPUP Web Site

Trainers:  6th Grade - 
                  7th Grade - 
                  8th Grade - Donna Makey

CRCSD Facilitator: Carol Cassells

CRCSD Language Arts "Wiki"

CRCSD CAL Table of Contents